Discussion

This page is for general discussion about the “Nude World Order” universe,  Permanent Nudity, this website itself, or anything else that seems relevant, including real-life nudity experiences and other media featuring similar themes.

Note: If replying to a specific comment, please use the Reply link below it to keep conversations easy to follow.

107 Replies to “Discussion”

  1. A single day each year to try nudity (full or partial) need not be complicated at all. The state just has to announce that the rules will not be enforced at all for one day. Gives people thinking about registering a chance to try it out in real life before committing to a year or more. Of course, registered people can wear clothes on that day.

    • It was not my intention to establish a system as complex as possible. I believe that this opportunity to move one day naked in public must be earned with some kind of consideration! Otherwise, this day is exploited by people who do not even think about a registration. Moreover, it is a privilege granted by the state to the citizen to be naked on this day, but not a grant of any previously suppressed fundamental right of the citizen. So there must be some lasting consequences for the citizen to earn this privilege. I see the best consequence in the permanent accessibility of the participants’ nude photos for the whole world and especially for the respective places and communities in which the participants live.

  2. @All

    What do you think about an annual “dare you Day!” or a “try it Day!” for all unregistered *) or partially registered people? A day so everyone has the opportunity to move completely naked in public without having to sign up. For all partially registered it should be possible within this 24h (but not a second later!) To change the original registration to full nudity. Of course, then this change should mean twice the period of the original registration. Of course, no already completed days of the original registration should be subtracted at the changed time span. For Example: Someone who has been registered topless for 2 years and has already completed 600 days or so, has to complete after changing the registration a total of 1460 days (full 4 years) and not just 860.

    *) Maybe only if they have previously uploaded a full-frontal nude photo of themselves to the national pn homepage, which stays online forever. An algo- rmytm on Facebook and other services should then, depending on the place of residence, share a list of all participants of the day with the pictures of the pn homepage.

    • I held off on commenting because I am curious what other people will think of the idea, and I feared an “authoritative” answer might put them off, but since no one replied anyway… (which doesn’t mean you can’t still of course)

      I think it sounds like a good idea, although I would probably have it work a little more similar to normal registration. That is, you still have to sign up, probably in person, and you’d still be required to go naked if you do. The fact that you can do it for only one day seems like a good enough reason to get people interested.

      And I’m always a little cautious about sweeping changes to the setting, so I would probably rely on my usual excuse and say this is local thing some state/country is doing, rather than everywhere.

      On the part about changing topless to nude, that seems a little over-complicated. Generally my thinking is that this would be allowed anyway (can’t see any reason it shouldn’t be) and the only requirement would be that the new registration be equal to or longer than both the usual minimum and the current registration.

      • Part of the fun is to think about the real world implementation details of the various ideas. PN is allowed on civil liberty grounds: some people believe the state should not prevent them from being naked, and the state has no good grounds for denying them this freedom. But other people object to the idea that people can just go naked whenever they feel like it, so there is a political balance which needs to be made. To prevent people from just going naked on a whim, and offending the poor prudes because they didn’t think or care, the state insists that nudity is something you have to think about seriously (hence the registration) and is something which comes with a cost (hence the ‘permanent’ bit and the minimum term).

        Personally, I think you should just ignore the prudes and allow people to wear whatever they like whenever they like, unless there is an objection on the grounds of health, safety or serious cost. Personal liberty is too important to sacrifice just because some people don’t like it. But that is not the NWO world – or ours, for the present at least.

        So I’m trying to understand this “dare you Day!” or “try it Day!” idea. I see what the PN and PN-friendly people get out of it, but what is the quid pro quo? What do the prudes get out of it? Why would they allow this legislation to be passed?

        • Now, this is the kind of discussion I like!

          As you know, I’ve never really pinned down the origins of permanent nudity, and for lack of any really good ideas I’ve chosen to leave it mysterious. But, I imagine that the current state of affairs is based on trying to strike a balance much like you describe.

          But another piece of the puzzle, possibly explaining this kind of thing, is that the balance isn’t necessarily the same everywhere. Some places (broadly speaking, “liberal” ones, in any sense of the term) might have a more favorable view of permanent nudity, and even a significant contingent of people who, like you and I, would be in favor of “at will nudity” (as it’s known in the setting). So this kind of thing could be an example of pushing the bounds a bit in places where they can get away with it.

          Somehow the idea that the “cost” for this is publicly submitting a nude photo doesn’t quite resonate with me, but I suppose that could still be considered a concession to the anti-casual-nudity contingent, since it will to some extent discourage people from trying it just on a whim.

  3. This is kind of an odd, self serving comment but hear me out. I was thinking recently that I no longer have my Tumblr blog active and it’s a shame I can’t even see my own older submissions/posts easily. Then I remembered the “reblog” tag and that a lot of the stuff I posted before Tumblr’s stricter rules are there! So I can just take a trip down memory lane whenever I like it, since most of the “reblog” posts are mine. :) Just wanted to say thanks for inadvertently creating a tag that helps me find my own stuff really easily! It will of course not have anything since January, but still, it comes in handy! So thanks, NWO. :)

    • Hey, glad that tag proved to be of some use. BTW, don’t forget you can also check out your old blog via that tumbex service I talked about a while back.

      Also, to view submissions from a certain person on this blog, you can put their name in the search box just above the tag cloud. That shows up a list of titles, which you have to click to see the actual pictures though. That’s something I’d like to change, but I haven’t got around to figuring out how.

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